Rich Fleetwood on Survival & Preparedness – Founded/Established 1997
Summertime’s coming … and you’re going to need new gear!
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Site last updated April 13, 2012  - 1600  ET

Situation Update

 

Synopsis:

During week 14 (April 1-7, 2012), influenza activity was elevated in some areas of the United States, but declined nationally and in most regions.

  • U.S. Virologic Surveillance: Of the 3,607 specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division, 756 (21.0%) were positive for influenza.
  • Novel influenza A Virus: One human infection with a novel influenza A virus was identified.
  • Pneumonia and Influenza (P&I) Mortality Surveillance: The proportion of deaths attributed to P&I was below the epidemic threshold.
  • Influenza-associated Pediatric Mortality: No influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
  • Outpatient Illness Surveillance: The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.5%, which is below the national baseline of 2.4%. Region 10 reported ILI above its region-specific baseline level. One state experienced moderate ILI activity, 1 state experienced low ILI activity; New York City and 48 states experienced minimal ILI activity, and the District of Columbia had insufficient data to calculate ILI activity.
  • Geographic Spread of Influenza: Ten states reported widespread geographic activity; 9 states reported regional influenza activity; 20 states reported local activity; the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 11 states reported sporadic activity, and Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported no influenza activity.

 

National and Regional Summary of Select Surveillance Components

HHS Surveillance Regions* Data for current week Data cumulative since October 2, 2011 (Week 40)
Out-patient ILI† % of respiratory specimens positive for flu‡ Number of jurisdictions reporting regional or widespread activity§ A (H3) 2009 H1N1 A(Subtyping not performed) B Pediatric Deaths
Nation Normal 21.0% 19 of 54 8,226 3,143 3,440 1,420 13
Region 1 Normal 21.2% 4 of 6 186 72 51 60 0
Region 2 Normal 20.6% 2 of 4 180 155 114 83 0
Region 3 Normal 24.4% 0 of 6 584 83 137 142 0
Region 4 Normal 14.3% 1 of 8 498 162 1,076 237 3
Region 5 Normal 49.2% 2 of 6 2,363 184 102 191 1
Region 6 Normal 17.1% 0 of 5 221 347 712 144 4
Region 7 Normal 21.0% 1 of 4 1,289 153 268 39 1
Region 8 Normal 27.2% 4 of 6 1,280 986 613 57 0
Region 9 Normal 28.1% 3 of 5 1,080 731 342 164 4
Region 10 Elevated 38.2% 2 of 4 545 270 25 303 0

 

*HHS regions (Region 1 CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT; Region 2: NJ, NY, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands; Region 3: DE, DC, MD, PA, VA, WV; Region 4: AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN; Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI; Region 6: AR, LA, NM, OK, TX; Region 7: IA, KS, MO, NE; Region 8: CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY; Region 9: AZ, CA, Guam, HI, NV; and Region 10: AK, ID, OR, WA).
† Elevated means the % of visits for ILI is at or above the national or region-specific baseline
‡ National data are for current week; regional data are for the most recent three weeks
§ Includes all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands

U.S. Virologic Surveillance:

WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories located in all 50 states report to CDC the number of respiratory specimens tested for influenza and the number positive by influenza type and subtype. The results of tests performed during the current week are summarized in the table below.

 

Week 14
No. of specimens tested 3,607
No. of positive specimens (%) 756 (21.0%)
Positive specimens by type/subtype
  Influenza A 607 (80.3%)
             2009 H1N1 133 (21.9%)
             Subtyping not performed 207 (34.1%)
             (H3) 267 (44.0%)
  Influenza B 149 (19.7%)

Predominant influenza viruses can vary by region and even between states within the same region. Nationally, seasonal influenza A (H3) viruses have predominated since the start of the 2011-2012 season and continue to remain overwhelmingly predominant in Regions 3, 5 and 7, however, 2009 H1N1 viruses continue to circulate in several regions. The timing of influenza activity also can vary by region. While influenza activity may have peaked and be declining in some states or regions, other areas may not yet have reached their peak activity level. Influenza viruses circulate year-round and substantial activity may occur as late as May.

 

INFLUENZA Virus Isolated
View National and Regional Level Graphs and Data | View Chart Data | View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file
 

Novel Influenza A Viruses:

One human infection with a novel influenza A virus was detected in a child in Utah. The child was infected with an influenza A (H3N2) variant virus similar to those identified in the 12 human infections that occurred between July and November 2011 in Indiana (2), Pennsylvania (3), Maine (2), Iowa (3) and West Virginia (2). The child has recovered. Contact with swine in the week preceding onset of the child’s illness was reported. State public health and agriculture officials are investigating case contacts and sources of exposure; no additional confirmed cases have been detected at this time. Additional information on these cases can be found in the CDC Flu Spotlight posting.

CDC is required to report all cases of human infection with novel (non-human) influenza viruses – including influenza viruses of swine origin – to the World Health Organization (WHO)External Web Site Icon as part of the International Health Regulations (IHR)External Web Site Icon. Domestically, CDC reports these cases in this report and on its website. Early identification and investigation of human infections with novel influenza A viruses is critical in order to evaluate the extent of the outbreak and possible human-to-human transmission. Additional information on influenza in pigs and variant influenza infection in humans can be found at Information on Variant Influenza Viruses.

Antigenic Characterization:

CDC has antigenically characterized 1,084 influenza viruses [240 2009 H1N1 viruses, 692 influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and 152 influenza B viruses] collected by U.S. laboratories since October 1, 2011.

2009 H1N1 [240]

  • Two hundred thirty-eight (99.2%) of the 240 viruses were characterized as A/California/7/2009-like, the influenza A (H1N1) component of the 2011-2012 influenza vaccine for the Northern Hemisphere.
  • Two viruses (0.8%) tested showed reduced titers with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009.

Influenza A (H3N2) [692]

  • Five hundred fifty-seven (80.5%) of the 692 viruses were characterized as A/Perth/16/2009-like, the influenza A (H3N2) component of the 2011-2012 influenza vaccine for the Northern Hemisphere.
  • One hundred thirty-five viruses (19.5%) tested showed reduced titers with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009.

Influenza B (B/Victoria/02/87 and B/Yamagata/16/88 lineages) [152]:

  • Victoria Lineage [64]: Sixty-four (42.1%) of the 152 influenza B viruses tested belong to the B/Victoria lineage of viruses.
  • Fifty-eight (90.6%) of these 64 viruses were characterized as B/Brisbane/60/2008-like, the influenza B component of the 2011-2012 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.
  • Six (9.4%) of these 64 viruses showed reduced titers with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/2008.
  • Yamagata Lineage [88]: Eighty-eight (57.9%) of the 152 influenza B viruses tested belong to the B/Yamagata lineage of viruses.

Only a small number of influenza B viruses from the United States have been available for testing this season. While less than 50% of these viruses are similar to the influenza B component in the 2011-2012 influenza vaccine, the majority of influenza B viruses circulating worldwide have been similar to the influenza B component of the 2011-2012 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.

Composition of the 2012-2013 Influenza Vaccine:

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended vaccine viruses for the 2012-2013 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines, and FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) has made recommendations for the composition of the 2012-2013 U.S. influenza vaccines. Both agencies recommend that the vaccine contain A/California/7/2009-like (2009 H1N1), A/Victoria/361/2011-like (H3N2), and B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like (B/Yamagata lineage) viruses. This recommendation changes the influenza A (H3N2) and influenza B virus components of the 2011-2012 Northern Hemisphere vaccine formulation. This recommendation was based on global influenza virus surveillance data related to epidemiology and antigenic characteristics, serological responses to 2011-2012 trivalent seasonal vaccines, and the availability of candidate strains and reagents.

Antiviral Resistance:

Testing of 2009 influenza A (H1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B virus isolates for resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) is performed at CDC using a functional assay. Additional 2009 influenza A (H1N1) clinical samples are tested for a single mutation in the neuraminidase of the virus known to confer oseltamivir resistance (H275Y). The data summarized below combine the results of both testing methods. These samples are routinely obtained for surveillance purposes rather than for diagnostic testing of patients suspected to be infected with an antiviral resistant virus.

High levels of resistance to the adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) persist among 2009 H1N1 and A (H3N2) viruses (the adamantanes do not have activity against influenza B viruses). As a result of the sustained high levels of resistance among circulating influenza A viruses, data from adamantane resistance testing are not presented in the table below.

 

Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance Testing Results on Samples Collected Since October 1, 2011

Oseltamivir Zanamivir
Virus Samples tested (n) Resistant Viruses, Number (%) Virus Samples tested (n) Resistant Viruses, Number (%)
Influenza A (H3N2) 736 0 (0.0) 736 0 (0.0)
Influenza B 173 0 (0.0) 173 0 (0.0)
2009 H1N1 490 7 (1.4) 293 0 (0.0)

Rare sporadic cases of oseltamivir resistant 2009 H1N1 and influenza A (H3N2) viruses have been detected worldwide. Antiviral treatment with oseltamivir or zanamivir is recommended as early as possible for patients with confirmed or suspected influenza who have severe, complicated, or progressive illness; who require hospitalization; or who are at greater risk for influenza-related complications. Additional information on recommendations for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza virus infection with antiviral agents is available at (http://www.cdc.gov/flu/antivirals/index.htm).

Pneumonia and Influenza (P&I) Mortality Surveillance:

During week 14, 7.5% of all deaths reported through the 122-Cities Mortality Reporting System were due to P&I. This percentage was below the epidemic threshold of 7.8% for week 14.

Pneumonia And Influenza Mortality
View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file

Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality:

No influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported to CDC during week 14. A total of 13 influenza-associated pediatric deaths have been reported during the 2011-2012 season.

 

Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality
View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file
 

Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations:

The Influenza Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) conducts population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations in children younger than 18 years of age (since the 2003-2004 influenza season) and adults (since the 2005-2006 influenza season).

The FluSurv-NET covers more than 80 counties in the 10 Emerging Infections Program (EIP) states (CA, CO, CT, GA, MD, MN, NM, NY, OR, TN) and additional Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Project (IHSP) states. The IHSP began during the 2009-2010 season to enhance surveillance during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. IHSP sites included IA, ID, MI, OK and SD during the 2009-2010 season; ID, MI, OH, OK, RI, and UT during the 2010-2011 season; and MI, OH, RI, and UT during the 2011-2012 season. The rates provided are likely to be a vast underestimate of the actual number of influenza-associated hospitalizations. First, the FluSurv-NET is not nationally representative, and second, influenza-associated hospitalizations can be missed, either because testing is not performed, or because cases may be attributed to other causes of pneumonia or other common influenza-related complications.

Between October 1, 2011 and April 7, 2012, 1,743 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations were reported at a rate of 6.3 per 100,000 population. Among cases, 1,539 (88.3%) were influenza A, 185 (10.6%) were influenza B, and 5 (0.3%) were influenza A and B co-infections; 14 (0.8%) had no virus type information. Among those with influenza A subtype information, 547 (71.3%) were H3N2 and 213 (27.8%) were 2009 H1N1. The most commonly reported underlying medical conditions among adults were chronic lung diseases, obesity and metabolic disorders. The most commonly reported underlying medical conditions in children were chronic lung diseases, asthma and neurologic disorders. However, almost half of hospitalized children had no identified underlying medical conditions.

Click on graph to launch interactive tool
View Interactive Application | View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file

Underlying medical conditions

View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file

Outpatient Illness Surveillance:

Nationwide during week 14, 1.5% of patient visits reported through the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet) were due to influenza-like illness (ILI). This percentage is below the national baseline of 2.4%. (ILI is defined as fever (temperature of 100°F [37.8°C] or greater) and cough and/or sore throat.)

national levels of ILI and ARI
View National and Regional Level Graphs and Data | View Chart Data | View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft PowerPoint file

On a regional level, the percentage of outpatient visits for ILI ranged from 0.7% to 2.4% during week 14. Region 10 reported a proportion of outpatient visits for ILI above its region-specific baseline level.

ILINet State Activity Indicator Map:

Data collected in ILINet are used to produce a measure of ILI activity* by state. Activity levels are based on the percent of outpatient visits in a state due to ILI and are compared to the average percent of ILI visits that occur during spring and fall weeks with little or no influenza virus circulation. Activity levels range from minimal, which corresponds to ILI activity being below average, to intense, which corresponds to ILI activity being much higher than average. Because the clinical definition of ILI is very general, not all ILI is caused by influenza; however, when combined with laboratory data, the information on ILI activity provides a clearer picture of influenza activity in the United States.

During week 14, the following ILI activity levels were experienced:

  • One state experienced moderate ILI activity (Idaho)
  • One state experienced low ILI activity (Hawaii).
  • New York City and 48 states experienced minimal ILI activity (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming).
  • Data were insufficient to calculate an ILI activity level from the District of Columbia.

Click on map to launch interactive tool

 

Click on map to launch interactive tool

*This map uses the proportion of outpatient visits to health care providers for influenza-like illness to measure the ILI activity level within a state. It does not, however, measure the extent of geographic spread of flu within a state. Therefore, outbreaks occurring in a single city could cause the state to display high activity levels.
Data collected in ILINet may disproportionately represent certain populations within a state, and therefore, may not accurately depict the full picture of influenza activity for the whole state.
Data displayed in this map are based on data collected in ILINet, whereas the State and Territorial flu activity map are based on reports from state and territorial epidemiologists. The data presented in this map is preliminary and may change as more data is received.
Differences in the data presented here by CDC and independently by some state health departments likely represent differing levels of data completeness with data presented by the state likely being the more complete.

Geographic Spread of Influenza as Assessed by State and Territorial Epidemiologists:

The influenza activity reported by state and territorial epidemiologists indicates geographic spread of influenza viruses, but does not measure the intensity of influenza activity.

During week 14, the following influenza activity was reported:

  • Widespread influenza activity was reported by 10 states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Kentucky, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, and Vermont).
  • Regional influenza activity was reported by 9 states (Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wyoming).
  • Local influenza activity was reported by 20 states (Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin).
  • Sporadic influenza activity was reported by the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 11 states (Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia).
  • Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported no influenza activity.

Flu Activity data in XML Format | View Full Screen

 

 

Additional National and International Influenza Surveillance Information

U.S. State and local influenza surveillance: Click on a jurisdiction below to access the latest local influenza information.

 

 

AlabamaExternal Web Site Icon AlaskaExternal Web Site Icon ArizonaExternal Web Site Icon ArkansasExternal Web Site Icon CaliforniaExternal Web Site Icon
ColoradoExternal Web Site Icon ConnecticutExternal Web Site Icon DelawareExternal Web Site Icon District of ColumbiaExternal Web Site Icon FloridaExternal Web Site Icon
GeorgiaExternal Web Site Icon HawaiiExternal Web Site Icon IdahoExternal Web Site Icon IllinoisExternal Web Site Icon IndianaExternal Web Site Icon
IowaExternal Web Site Icon KansasExternal Web Site Icon KentuckyExternal Web Site Icon LouisianaExternal Web Site Icon MaineExternal Web Site Icon
MarylandExternal Web Site Icon MassachusettsExternal Web Site Icon MichiganExternal Web Site Icon MinnesotaExternal Web Site Icon MississippiExternal Web Site Icon
MissouriExternal Web Site Icon MontanaExternal Web Site Icon NebraskaExternal Web Site Icon NevadaExternal Web Site Icon New HampshireExternal Web Site Icon
New JerseyExternal Web Site Icon New MexicoExternal Web Site Icon New YorkExternal Web Site Icon North CarolinaExternal Web Site Icon North DakotaExternal Web Site Icon
OhioExternal Web Site Icon OklahomaExternal Web Site Icon OregonExternal Web Site Icon PennsylvaniaExternal Web Site Icon Rhode IslandExternal Web Site Icon
South CarolinaExternal Web Site Icon South DakotaExternal Web Site Icon TennesseeExternal Web Site Icon TexasExternal Web Site Icon UtahExternal Web Site Icon
VermontExternal Web Site Icon VirginiaExternal Web Site Icon Washington Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon West VirginiaExternal Web Site Icon WisconsinExternal Web Site Icon
WyomingExternal Web Site Icon New York CityExternal Web Site Icon Virgin IslandsExternal Web Site Icon

Google Flu Trends: Google Flu Trends uses aggregated Google search data in a model created in collaboration with CDC to estimate influenza activity in the United States. For more information and activity estimates from the U.S. and worldwide, see http://www.google.org/flutrends/External Web Site Icon

Europe: for the most recent influenza surveillance information from Europe, please see WHO/Europe at http://www.euroflu.org/index.phpExternal Web Site Icon and visit the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control at http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications/surveillance_reports/influenza/Pages/weekly_influenza_surveillance_overview.aspx External Web Site Icon

Public Health Agency of Canada: The most up-to-date influenza information from Canada is available at http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fluwatch/External Web Site Icon

World Health Organization FluNet: Additional influenza surveillance information from participating WHO member nations is available at FluNetExternal Web Site Icon and the Global Epidemiology ReportsExternal Web Site Icon

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A description of surveillance methods is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/overview.htm

 Get the last information here: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/

CDC H1N1 Flu Website Situation Update, March 14, 2010
Key Flu Indicators
Each week CDC analyzes information about influenza disease activity in the United States and publishes findings of key flu indicators in a report called FluView. During the week of February 28 –March 6, 2010, most key flu indicators remained about the same as during the previous week. Below is a summary of the most recent key indicators:
Visits to doctors for influenza-like illness (ILI) nationally remained stable and ILI remains low nationally. ILI is also looked at by region and three of 10 U.S. regions are reporting elevated ILI. Elevated ILI was seen in regions 4, 7 and 9. Region 4 is comprised of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Region 7 is comprised of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska. And region 9 is comprised of Arizona, California, Hawaii and Nevada.
Laboratory-confirmed hospitalizations rates have leveled off and very few hospitalizations were reported by states during the week ending March 6.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) based on the 122 Cities Report showed a very slight decrease over last week and in general remains low. No flu-related pediatric deaths were reported this week. Since April 2009, CDC has received reports of 329 laboratory-confirmed pediatric deaths: 277 due to 2009 H1N1, 50 pediatric deaths that were laboratory confirmed as influenza A, but the flu virus subtype was not determined, and two pediatric deaths that were associated with seasonal influenza viruses. (Laboratory-confirmed deaths are thought to represent an undercount of the actual number. CDC has provided estimates about the number of 2009 H1N1 cases and related hospitalizations and deaths.
No states reported widespread influenza activity. Five states reported regional influenza activity. They are: Alabama, Georgia, Maine, Mississippi and South Carolina.
The majority of the influenza viruses identified so far continue to be 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses. These viruses remain similar to the virus chosen for the 2009 H1N1 vaccine, and remain susceptible to the antiviral drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir with rare exception. Some influenza B viruses are circulating at low levels, and these viruses remain similar to the influenza B virus component of the 2009-10 seasonal flu vaccine.
*All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.
Learn more >>U.S. Situation Update
Weekly Flu Activity EstimatesU.S. Patient Visits Reported for Influenza-like Illness (ILI)U.S. Influenza-like Illness (ILI) Reported by Regions

Laboratory Confirmed Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations
and Deaths from August 30 2009 to March 6, 2010
Posted March 12, 2010, 11:00 AM ET
Data reported to CDC by March 9, 2010, 12:00 AM ET
Cases Defined by Hospitalizations Deaths
Influenza Laboratory-Tests** 41,113 2,042
*Reports can be based on syndromic, admission or discharge data, or a combination of data elements that could include laboratory-confirmed and influenza-like illness hospitalizations.
*Laboratory confirmation includes any positive influenza test (rapid influenza tests, RT-PCR, DFA, IFA, or culture), whether or not typing was done.
The table shows aggregate reports of all laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalizations and deaths (including 2009 H1N1 and seasonal flu) since August 30, 2009 received by CDC from U.S. states and territories**. This table will be updated weekly each Friday at 11 a.m. For the 2009-2010 influenza season, states are reporting based on new case definitions for hospitalizations and deaths effective August 30, 2009.
CDC will continue to use its traditional surveillance systems to track the progress of the 2009-2010 influenza season. For more information about influenza surveillance, including reporting of influenza-associated hospitalizations and deaths, see Questions and Answers: Monitoring Influenza Activity, Including 2009 H1N1.
The number of 2009 H1N1 hospitalizations and deaths reported to CDC from April – August 2009 is available on the Past Situation Updates page.
For state level information, refer to state health departments.
International Human Cases of 2009 H1N1 Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization.
**States report weekly to CDC either 1) laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations and deaths or 2) pneumonia and influenza syndrome-based cases of hospitalization and death resulting from all types or subtypes of influenza. Although only the laboratory confirmed cases are included in this report, CDC continues to analyze data both from laboratory confirmed and syndromic hospitalizations and deaths.

U.S. Influenza-associated Pediatric Mortality
Posted March 12, 2010 (Updated Weekly)
Data reported to CDC by March 6, 2010
Date Reported Laboratory-Confirmed 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pediatric Deaths Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza A Subtype Unknown Pediatric Deaths Laboratory-Confirmed
Seasonal Influenza Total
This Week (Week 9, February 28 to March 6, 2010) 0 0 0 0
Since August 30, 2009 217 47 1 265
Cumulative since April 26, 2009 277 50 2 329
This table is based on data reported to CDC through the Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality Surveillance System. Influenza-associated deaths in children (persons less than 18 years) was added as nationally notifiable condition in 2004.
For more information about influenza-associated pediatric mortality, see FluView.

For more information about the U.S. situation, see the CDC H1N1 Flu U.S. Situation page.
International Situation Update

This report provides an update to the international situation using data collected through March 7, 2010, and reported by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 12. WHO continues to report laboratory-confirmed 2009 H1N1 flu cases and deaths on its Web page. These laboratory-confirmed cases represent a substantial underestimation of total cases in the world, as most countries focus surveillance and laboratory testing only on people with severe illness.
In nearly all countries of the world where influenza infection is reported, the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus continues to predominate among all subtyped influenza A viruses. Based on FluNet data collected by 28 countries from February 21 to February 27, 2010, 92.8% of all subtyped influenza A viruses were 2009 H1N1 positive. Among specimens that tested positive for influenza, 69.2% were typed as influenza A and 30.8% as influenza B.
The 2009 H1N1 virus is currently most actively being transmitted in Southeast Asia. Limited data suggests increases in 2009 H1N1 activity in West Africa. Influenza B viruses are the predominant virus subtype in some countries in Asia and appear to be increasing in other parts of the world, too. 2009 H1N1 activity remains low in the Americas and in the temperate zone of the Southern Hemisphere.
For more information about the international situation, see the CDC H1N1 Flu International Situation page.
Recent Updates of Interest
UPDATE: 2009 H1N1 Flu International Situation Update
This report provides an update to the international situation as of March 12, 2010. The World Health Organization (WHO) continues to report updated 2009 H1N1 flu-associated laboratory-confirmed cases and deaths on its Web page.
UPDATE: CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in the United States, April 2009 - February 13, 2010
CDC has again updated its estimates of the total number of 2009 H1N1 cases, hospitalizations and deaths in the United States since April, 2009. The new estimates incorporate an additional four weeks of flu data from the previous estimates released on February 12, 2010.
UPDATE: Weekly FluView Map and Surveillance Report for Week Ending March 6, 2010
During week 9 (February 28 - March 6, 2010), influenza activity remained at approximately the same levels as last week in the U.S. 174 (5.1%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
UPDATE: Influenza and Pneumonia-Associated Hospitalizations and Deaths from August 30, 2009 to March 6, 2010
FluView reports that for the week of February 21 - February 27, 2010, flu activity in the United States was relatively low, with most flu continuing to be caused by 2009 H1N1. Flu activity, caused by either 2009 H1N1 or seasonal flu viruses, may rise and fall, but is expected to continue for weeks. It's possible that the United States could experience another wave of flu activity caused by either 2009 H1N1 or seasonal influenza.
NEW: American College Health Association (ACHA) Influenza Vaccination Letter
This is a letter developed jointly by the American College Health Association (ACHA) and CDC intended for distribution to colleges and universities across the country prior to Spring Break. The message to students is: Don't let influenza spoil your plans for Spring Break. Take the opportunity to get vaccinated before leaving for Spring Break and protect yourself, friends and family against 2009 H1N1 flu.
Additional Updates on the CDC H1N1 Flu Website
To learn about other recent updates made to the CDC H1N1 Flu Website, please check the "What's New" page on the CDC H1N1 Flu website. CDC H1N1 Flu Website Situation Update, March 14, 2010
Key Flu Indicators
Each week CDC analyzes information about influenza disease activity in the United States and publishes findings of key flu indicators in a report called FluView. During the week of February 28 –March 6, 2010, most key flu indicators remained about the same as during the previous week. Below is a summary of the most recent key indicators:

Information Specialist 1 at Wyoming Department of Corrections - Honor Farm

Rich is the founder of SurvivalRing, now in it's 17th year, author of multimedia CDs and DVDs, loves the outdoors, his family, his geeky skill-set, and lives in rural Wyoming. Always ready to help others, he shares what he learns on multiple blogs, social sites, and more. With a background in preparedness and survival skills, training with county, state, and national organizations, and skills in all areas of media and on air experience in live radio and television, Rich is always thinking about the "big picture", when it comes to helping individuals and families prepare for life's little surprises.

Since 1997, he has provided guidance, authentic government survival history, and commentary on why we all need to get ready for that fateful day in the future, when we have to get our hands dirty and step in to save the day. He is an award winning videographer (2005 Telly Award), has received state and national scholarly recognition (2006 New Century Scholar and All USA Academic Team), and is a natural with computers, technology, gadgets, small furry mammals, and anything on wheels.

Rich likes making friends, solving problems, and creating solutions to everyday issues. He doesn't mind mixing things up, when there is a teaching moment ready to happen. As a constitutional conservative, he's staying quite busy these days.

Rich Fleetwood – who has written posts on SurvivalRing.


VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
QR Code - Take this post Mobile!
Use this unique QR (Quick Response) code with your smart device. The code will save the url of this webpage to the device for mobile sharing and storage.
Support James Stevens…in print since 1975 – FRESH update~
Making the Best of Basics
Some great items to add to your home…